BRUNSWICK Phonographs

Brunswick was founded by Swiss immigrant, John M. Brunswick. The J.M. Brunswick Manufacturing Company opened in 1845, in Cincinnati, Ohio. Brunswick intended his business to make horse carriages, he decided that making billiard tables would be more profitable, as the better billiard tables were imported from England. Brunswick billiard tables were a commercial success, and opened up the first of what would become many branch offices in Chicago, Illinois in 1848.

In 1873, the Brunswick company merged with competitor Great Western Billiard Manufactory owned by Julius Balke to become the Brunswick & Balke Company.

In 1884, another competitor, H.W. Collender Company of New York was absorbed to form the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company.

The company expanded into making a number of other products. Bowling balls, pins, and equipment led a growing line of sporting equipment. Brunswick expanded the product line to include such diverse products as toilet seats, automobile tires and phonographs.

The Brunswick line of home phonographs were commercially successful. Brunswick scored big with their "Ultona" phonograph capable of playing Edison Disc Records, Pathé disc records, and standard 78’s. In the late 1910s, they introduced Brunswick Records. These first Brunswick Records used the vertical cut system like Edison Disc Records, and were not sold in large numbers.

In 1920, a lateral cut (Needle cut) line of records was released. This system that was then becoming the standard for 78 disc records. Within a few years, Brunswick became one of the USA's Big Three record companies, along with Victor and Columbia Records.

Brunswick knew the importance of signing artists to their label and recorded such artists; Bob Haring, Isham Jones, Ben Bernie, and Abe Lyman, banjoist Harry Reser, Al Jolson, Fletcher Henderson, Duke Ellington, King Oliver, Andy Kirk, Red Nichols and others. In late 1924, Brunswick acquired the Vocalion Records label. In 1930, Brunswick sold the control of the record company to Warner Brothers. In 1939, Brunswick label was sold to Columbia Broadcasting System. In 1944, Decca revived the Brunswick label, mostly for reissues of recordings from earlier decades, particularly Bing Crosby's early hits of 1931 and jazz items from the 1920s.

The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company officially changed its name to the Brunswick Corporation on April 10, 1960. Brunswick acquired Mercury Marine in 1961. In the 1980s, Brunswick became a major maker of yachts and pleasure boats, whose brands include Bayliner, Boston Whaler, Maxum, Sea Ray, and Trophy.

 


  1. The main arm that fits into the elbow to the flange. It has a forward and backward movement. This portion must be pushed back when playing Pathé and all other records. When playing Edison records, this part must be pulled forward.

  2. The weight is inserted in the rear portion of the balance arm. The weight must be pulled forward when playing all Pathé and all other records. When playing Edison records, the arm is pulled forward and this weight must be adjusted to the back end of the arm.

  3. The Reproducer revolves on the front end of the balance arm. It can be adjusted for playing various records.

 

  1. Place the reproducer as shown in the image and push it backward over the tone arm.

  2. The locking pin will snap over the notch into the groove. In this groove, the reproducer can easily be turned into three different positions for playing all makes of records.

 

Reproducer locking pin is in the groove and can be turned to the left for the three different positions. See the image below.



The reproducer is turned one quarter to the left, locking pink into the first notch. The reproducer is now ready to play Pathe and other vertical cut records.
A. Locking pin
B. Move tone arm all the way back
C. Balance weight is moved forward

 

This shows the reproducer after it has been turned one quarter to the left. The stylus bar containing the metal needle has been turned downward.

 

This image below shows the reproducer in the correct playing position.


  1. The tone arm must be pushed back into the elbow for playing records.

  2. Balance arm must be towards the front.


Changing the Metal needle when playing Victor and other lateral cut 78rpm records.


The reproducer is turned upward and the needle is easily removed from the reproducer. Replace it with a new metal needle and tighten into place using the thumbscrew.

 

Proper placement for Edison Records

This shows the reproducer turned one quarter from the previous position and is ready for playing Edison records. The reproducer uses a diamond point and no change of the needle is necessary.

  1. The tone arm must be moved forward the entire distance.

  2. Balance weight must be moved all the way back in the balance arm.

 

Adjusting the Auto Stop

A. Move the handle so that the curved arm of the auto stop touched the part extending beneath the turntable.

B. While the point of the needle is in the inner groove of the record, adjust the auto stop.

 

Movies
NEEDLES

 

© 2011 MyOldPhonograph.com

EXCELLENT WEBSITE FOR INFORMATION ON OLD PHONOGRAPHS, PHONOGRAPHS GRAMOPHONES ANTIQUE PHONOGRAPHS SONORA EDISON VICTOR VICTOR TALKING MACHINE COLUMBIA PATHE RECORDS BRUNSWICK INFORMATION ON ANTIQUE PHONOGRAPHS GRAMOPHONE GRAFANOLA GRAPHOPHONE INFORMATION RECORD PLAYERS CHAMBERLAIN NEEDLES STYLUS SAPPHIRE DIAMOND DISC CYLINDERS CYLINDAR ADVERTISEMENTS INFORMATION ON OLD PHONOGRAPHS PHONOS FREE INFORMATION PHOTOS REPRODUCERS HORNS PARTS PHONOGRAPH PARTS LEATHER BELTS SONATA ANTIQUES ANTIQUE OLD TYME REPRODUCTIONS FAKES HMV HIS MASTERS VOICE NIPPER RCA VICTOR APPRAISALS APPRAISAL OF OLD PHONOGRAPHS INF

Adora, Alethetone, Adobe, Ambassador, American, American Maid, Americanola, Amerinola, Angelus, Arietta, Armoniola, Arrow, Art Craft Line, Artofola, Artophone, Ashland, Autophone, Baby Grand, Best, Baby Phonograph, Bernini, Beacon, Berliner, Belcanto, Blandin, Blue Bird, Bobolink, Brendonne, Brooks, Bush and Lane, Cupid Phonograph, Campbell, Columbia, Grafanola, Victrola, Cardinal, Carmen, Cathedral, Danceola, Cecilaphone, chicago, Joliet, Bush and Lane Piano Company, Century, Ceramiphone, Chamberlain Phonograph, Charmaphone, Cheney, Chorister, Cirola, Classique, Claxtonola, Clayola, Crayo, Cleartone, Cleola, Compatophone, Concertola, Cinderola, Consola, Cowan, Crafts, Cremonia, Crescent, Crippen, Crosley, Crystola, Culptone, Dalion, Davenola, Diamond, Deca-Disc, Delpheon, Deterling, Diamond, Dolce Tone, Domestic, Dulciphone, Dulcitone, Dusonto, Eclipse, Edison, Edmondson, Electric, Elmbro, Embrola, Emerson, Empire, Eubanola, Eufonola, Excel, Favorite, Favorola, Fern-O-Grand, Firestone, Fischer, Flemish, Fraad, Franklin, Fullertone, Fulton, Gabelola, Garford, General, Granby, Grande, Hallet and Davis, Harmonia, Harmonola, Harponola, Grandola, Granola, Harpvola, Harrolla, Hawthorn, Hayne'ola, Heintzman, Heywood-Wakefield, Hexaphone, Hiawatha, Hoffay, Humanatone, Humanola, Ideal, Imperial, Independent, international, Interpretone, Johnson, Jewett, Gramophone, Phonograph, Grafaphone, Graphaphone, Triumph, Gem, Puck, Home, Standard A, Edison Standard, Talk-O-Phone, Zonophone, Gramophone Co, His Masters Voice, HMV, Kamp-Fone, Kiddiephone, Kimball, Wko-Hi-Ola, Koch-O-Phone, Lakeside, Lampograph, Feraud, L'Artiste, Lauzon, Lawson, Liberty, Librola, Linerphone, Lone-Star, Lorophone, Ludlow, Lynertone, Talking Machine Co., Lyradion, Lamp, Lyreola, Lyre-Ola, Lyrian, Maestro, Lanski, Maestrola, Sound Reproduction Company, Mag-Ni-Phone, Magnola, Majestic, MGM, Mandel, Macintosh, Manophone, Marvelon, Marveola, Mascot, Mastertone, Mellowtone, Melodia, Melodograph, Melody, Melophone, Meteor, Metro, Metrophone, Mockingbird, Modernola, Morenus, Mozart, Munola, Musicola, Mutual, National Bluebird, Silly Simon, National, Natural Voice, Newman Brothers, Nightingale, Olympian, Onken, Operollo, Oranola, Oriola, Metropolis, Oro-Tone, Orsenigo, Oxford, Pathe, Pathé, Pal, Paramount, Peerless, Perfectrola, Phoenix, Phon d'Amor, Phono-Grand, Phonographic Table, Phonola, Silver Talking Machine, Phonolamp, Piknik, Playerphone, Player-Tone, Playonola, Plymouth, Pooley, Portola, Portophone, Premier, Prima-Donna, Puritan, Aretino, United, Qualitiphone, Ramosola, Re-Call, Recordion, Recruit, Reginaphone, Remington, Republic, Retola, Ausonia, Rishell, Riviera, Robinola, Robinson, Ross, Royal, Savoy, Sears Roebuck, Saxola, Schubert, Shell-O-Phone, Sapphire, Silvertone, Singaphone, Singerphone, Solophone, Solotone, Sonata, Sonora, Kesner and Jerlaw, Sona-Tone, Spraytone, Starr, Steger, Steinburn, Stein-Burn, Steinola, Argento, Sterling, Stewart, , Stodart, Stradivara, The Compton-Price, Strand, Strickler, Supertone, Supreme, Superior, Swanson, Tablatone, DeRivas and Harris, Tel-O-Tone, Western News, The Lucky 13, Tiffany, Ton-O-Graf, Tonkola, Tonola, Toyphone, Triton, United, Usona, Valuphone, Wizard, Vanophone, Venus Belle, Verdiola, Illinois Talking Machine, Veritone, Virginia, W. P. Mertens, Virtuoso, Republic Phonograph, Vista, Vista Talking Machine, Vit, Victor, Victorla, Vitanola, Waddell, The Music Table, Waderola, Wade Talking Machine, Watrola, Wartell, Wegman, Weser, Westrola, The Wesley, Widdicomb, Wilson, Windsor, Wolf, Wonder, World, Xeniaphone, Davison Furniture, Yale, Davis Sales, Superior, Minneapolis, Stylus, Reproducer, Governor Springs, Mica, Diaphragm, Needle, Needles,

ORMATION PARTS FOR SALE SALES THUMB SCREW NO.2 SOUND BOX REPRODUCERS